Towson-Glen Arm Graphic Design – part 2

a flyer designed by Tricia Lane-Forster to promote the only live show ever to feature TGA improv music group Out; the central image is a slightly altered reproduction of the 1891 painting 'Le Captif' by William Adolphe-Bouguereau (courtesy of Lisa Starace) Shortly after originally posting this, Tricia-Lane Forster shed some light onto the origins of the image featured here and many of the other non-original images that she and Lisa Starace used in show flyers they designed; here's a quote from that message: 'Like most of our flyers with images like the one above, I believe we found it in the Towson State University library's discard pile.  There was a section in the library that had images from magazines and books carefully cut out and glued to tag board.  I believe they were used for teacher resources.  They usually had a description written in pencil at the bottom explaining what the image was.  For example:  "fruit,"  "gas station," etc.  Lisa and I would frequent the box labeled "discard pile" and took home many images from there.  The bottom of the tag board would be stamped with a rubber stamp:  DISCARD and they were free.  We had images hanging in our dorm room from there and I probably still have some...somewhere...  The discard pile was definitely one of my favorite things in college.  I doubt anything like it exists anymore...  I think we went there weekly.  I believe it was in the teacher resource center.  I often wondered who decided which images were too obsolete to be used anymore.  Some were really old and some were so strange."

a flyer designed by Tricia Lane-Forster to promote the only live show ever to feature TGA improv music group Out; the central image is a slightly altered reproduction of the 1891 painting ‘Le Captif’ by William Adolphe-Bouguereau (courtesy of Lisa Starace) Shortly after originally posting this, Tricia-Lane Forster shed some light onto the origins of the image featured here and many of the other non-original images that she and Lisa Starace used in show flyers they designed; here’s a quote from that message: ‘Like most of our flyers with images like the one above, I believe we found it in the Towson State University library’s discard pile. There was a section in the library that had images from magazines and books carefully cut out and glued to tag board. I believe they were used for teacher resources. They usually had a description written in pencil at the bottom explaining what the image was. For example: “fruit,” “gas station,” etc. Lisa and I would frequent the box labeled “discard pile” and took home many images from there. The bottom of the tag board would be stamped with a rubber stamp: DISCARD and they were free. We had images hanging in our dorm room from there and I probably still have some…somewhere… The discard pile was definitely one of my favorite things in college. I doubt anything like it exists anymore… I think we went there weekly. I believe it was in the teacher resource center. I often wondered who decided which images were too obsolete to be used anymore. Some were really old and some were so strange.”

"Those who find ugly meaning(s) in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault." So reads the Oscar Wilde quote featured at the bottom left corner of this piece, a 1994 flyer designed by Tricia-Lane Forster for a concert at The Loft in Baltimore; lettering by Lisa Starace; the other acts listed here weren't Towson-Glen Arm bands, though the band Jigsaw included Young Death member Jim Sajor (courtesy of Tricia Lane-Forster)

“Those who find ugly meaning(s) in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault.” So reads the Oscar Wilde quote featured at the bottom left corner of this piece, a 1994 flyer designed by Tricia-Lane Forster for a concert at The Loft in Baltimore; lettering by Lisa Starace; the other acts listed here weren’t Towson-Glen Arm bands, though the band Jigsaw included Young Death member Jim Sajor (courtesy of Tricia Lane-Forster)

Mysterious, provocative cover art from the first issue of Hell Cat zine designed and written by Laura Burke and Lara Oster in 1995. Laura Burke and Lara Oster were part of the legendary "L Crew" , a clique-within-the-clique of the TGA scene whose moniker was inspired by the fact that most of the Crew had first names that began with the letter "L". This group produced an enormous quantity of rare, limited edition zines and flyers which contained many aesthetic/political elements of both the 90's Riot Grrl movement and Towson-Glen Arm. (courtesy of Lara Oster)

Mysterious, provocative cover art from the first issue of Hell Cat zine designed and written by Laura Burke and Lara Oster in 1995. Laura Burke and Lara Oster were part of the legendary “L Crew”
, a clique-within-the-clique of the TGA scene whose moniker was inspired by the fact that most of the Crew had first names that began with the letter “L”. This group produced an enormous quantity of rare, limited edition zines and flyers which contained many aesthetic/political elements of both the 90’s Riot Grrl movement and Towson-Glen Arm. (courtesy of Lara Oster)

Page 20 from the zine Hell Cat by Laura Burke and Lara Oster. Most of this zine's contents represent Towson-Glen Arm's strong connection to the angst ridden zeitgeist of the Riot Grrl movement. Nonetheless, even with all the overt knods to radical feminism, Oster and Burke were definitely not skittish in letting their absurd TGA sensibilities freely mix with political expressions as is evident in this strange, occult-themed design piece. (courtesy of Lara Oster)

Page 20 from the zine Hell Cat by Laura Burke and Lara Oster. Most of this zine’s contents represent Towson-Glen Arm’s strong connection to the angst ridden zeitgeist of the Riot Grrl movement. Nonetheless, even with all the overt knods to radical feminism, Oster and Burke were definitely not skittish in letting their absurd TGA sensibilities freely mix with political expressions as is evident in this strange, occult-themed design piece. (courtesy of Lara Oster)

"Lay siege to Dullsvile!" A flyer advertising a 1998 Towson-Glen Arm concert at Baltimore all-ages venue The Small Intestine; design by Mike Apichella with some graphics taken from a 1960's ad for Harrisburg, Pa.'s J.H. Troup Music Co., an ad that was reprinted in the first edition of Mike Kuzmin's Pa. 60's rock discography 'Sounds From The Woods'.

“Lay siege to Dullsvile!” A flyer advertising a 1998 Towson-Glen Arm concert at Baltimore all-ages venue The Small Intestine; design by Mike Apichella with some graphics taken from a 1960’s ad for Harrisburg, Pa.’s J.H. Troup Music Co., an ad that was reprinted in the first edition of Mike Kuzmin’s Pa. 60’s rock discography ‘Sounds From The Woods’.

Detail from the flyer above

Detail from the flyer above

A rare, colorized Towson-Glen Arm flyer made advertising a performance by one of the last TGA bands, Mach Schau. This group evolved from the ashes of a band called The Spontaneous Gyrations. Like the preceding flyer, this piece is a playful, hallucinogenic distortion of teenage iconography, perhaps a subconscious knod to the nascent internet era's transmogrification of teen social mores. Whatever the case, the deconstruction of pre-fab 'youth culture' was a recurring TGA motif.

A rare, colorized Towson-Glen Arm flyer advertising a performance by one of the last TGA bands, Mach Schau. This group evolved from the ashes of a band called The Spontaneous Gyrations. Like the preceding flyer, this piece is a playful, hallucinogenic distortion of teenage iconography, perhaps a subconscious knod to the nascent internet era’s transmogrification of teen social mores. Whatever the case, the deconstruction of pre-fab ‘youth culture’ was a recurring TGA motif.

Here you can find more info. on Towson-Glen Arm graphic design: https://towsonglenarmfreakouts.wordpress.com/2014/11/24/towson-glen-arm-in-graphic-design-part-1/

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